India vs Australia Test Series 2017: 2nd Test Scorecard, Mar 4-7, M Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore

Australia had made a mockery of people’s opinions ahead of the India vs Australia Test series, and more importantly, dented the previously high-flying India’s confidence with a massive 333-run win in Pune. By beating India, the Aussies also broke their 12-year duck in India, of having not won a Test in 10 attempts. Naturally, the gauntlet had been laid down to the No. 1-ranked India ahead of the 2nd Test at the M Chinnaswamy Stadium in Bangalore, where Australia had won two of the four Tests the teams had played before.

India produced a no-show at what had become the 25th Test venue in India and must have known, going into the Bangalore Test, that they had to produce a great all-round performance to come back into the series against a resourceful and buoyant Australia. Even after such a great win and gaining a psychological edge over the hosts, Steve Smith’s men might have told themselves that India are still the favourites. But that if they kept doing what had brought them overwhelming success in Pune, they might well end up pulling a rabbit out of the hat.

Much of the spotlight was on the Bangalore pitch as well, after the pitch in Pune brought the first Test to a close well inside three days and had been rated “poor” by Chris Broad.

Match facts

India vs Australia Test Series 2017, 2nd Test
Date and time: 4, 5, 6, 7 Mar, 9:30 AM
Venue: M Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore

2017 India vs Australia 2nd Test Scorecard

Toss: won by Virat Kohli, who opted to bat first

Pitch report: Indian pitches come in many forms these days and the Bangalore pitch was representative of an unwatered and a cracked agricultural field. The pitch was full of cracks throughout and those cracks were expected to play a part come days three, four and five. Unlike in Pune, the top surface wasn’t loose and plenty of variable bounce was on offer for seamers and spinners, thanks to the cracks

Playing XIs

India: Virat Kohli*, Abhinav Mukund, Lokesh Rahul, Cheteshwar Pujara, Ajinkya Rahane, Karun Nair, Ravichandran Ashwin, Wriddhiman Saha (WK), Ravindra Jadeja, Ishant Sharma, and Umesh Yadav

Australia: Steve Smith*, David Warner, Matthew Renshaw, Shaun Marsh, Peter Handscomb, Mitchell Marsh, Matthew Wade (WK), Mitchell Starc, Steve O’Keefe, Nathan Lyon, and Josh Hazlewood

India vs Australia 2nd Test scores: India 189/10 and 274/10; Australia 276/10 and 112/10

Match result: India won the 2nd Test in Bangalore, by 75 runs, and level the four-Test series 1-1. Lokesh Rahul was awarded the man of the match for his 90 and 51 in the first and second innings.

      India’s Batting 1st Innings
Batsmen and dismissal Runs scored No. of 4s No. of 6s Strike rate
Lokesh Rahul

caught Renshaw, bowled Lyon

90 (205) 9 0 43.90
Abhinav Mukund

leg before wicket Starc

0 (8) 0 0 0.00
Cheteshwar Pujara

caught Handscomb, bowled Lyon

17 (66) 1 0 25.75
Virat Kohli

leg before wicket Lyon

12 (17) 2 0 70.58
Ajinkya Rahane

stumped Wade, bowled Lyon

17 (42) 2 0 40.47
Karun Nair

stumped Wade, bowled O’Keefe

26 (39) 3 0 66.66
Ravichandran Ashwin

caught Warner, bowled Ashwin

7 (14) 1 0 50.00
Wriddhiman Saha

caught Smith, bowled Lyon

1 (14) 0 0 7.14
Ravindra Jadeja

caught Smith, bowled Lyon

3 (16) 0 0 18.75
Umesh Yadav

not out

0 (6) 0 0 0.00
Ishant Sharma

caught Handscomb, bowled Lyon

0 (1) 0 0 0.00
Extras 16 (12 byes and 4 leg byes)
India’s total 189 all out in 71.2 overs, at 2.65 runs per over
India’s fall of wickets 11/1 (Mukund, 2.5), 72/2 (Pujara, 27.5), 88/3 (Kohli, 33.5), 118/4 (Rahane, 47.3), 156/5 (Nair, 57.2), 174/6 (Ashwin, 61.5), 178/7 (Saha, 65.3), 188/8 (Jadeja, 69.2), 189/9 (Rahul, 71.1), and 189/10 (Ishant, 71.2)
Australia’s Bowling 1st Innings
Bowlers Overs Maidens Runs conceded Wickets taken Economy rate
Mitchell Starc 15 5 39 1 2.60
Josh Hazlewood 11 2 42 0 3.81
Steve O’Keefe 21 5 40 1 1.90
Mitchell Marsh 2 0 2 0 1.00
Nathan Lyon 22.2 4 50 8 2.25
Australia’s Batting 1st Innings
Batsmen and dismissal Runs scored No. of 4s No. of 6s Strike rate
David Warner

bowled Ashwin

33 (67) 3 0 49.25
Matthew Renshaw

stumped Saha, bowled Jadeja

60 (196) 5 1 30.61
Steve Smith

caught Saha, bowled Jadeja

8 (52) 0 0 15.38
Shaun Marsh

caught Nair, bowled Umesh

66 (197) 4 0 33.50
Peter Handscomb

caught Ashwin, bowled Jadeja

16 (30) 2 0 53.33
Mitchell Marsh

leg before wicket Ishant

0 (11) 0 0 0.00
Matthew Wade

leg before wicket Jadeja

40 (113) 4 0 35.39
Mitchell Starc

caught Jadeja, bowled Ashwin

26 (52) 2 0 50.00
Steve O’Keefe

not out

4 (12) 0 0 33.33
Nathan Lyon

leg before wicket Jadeja

0 (1) 0 0 0.00
Josh Hazlewood

caught KL Rahul, bowled Jadeja

1 (9) 0 0 11.11
Extras 22 (14 byes, 5 no-balls and 3 leg byes)
Australia’s total 276 all out in 122.4 overs, at 2.25 runs per over
Australia’s fall of wickets 52/1 (Warner, 21.1), 82/2 (Smith, 41.2), 134/3 (Renshaw, 66.3), 160/4 (Handscomb, 76.4), 163/5 (M Marsh, 79.6), 220/6 (S Marsh, 100.2), 269/7 (Starc, 117.6), 274/8 (Wade, 120.1), 274/9 (Lyon, 120.2), and 276/10 (Hazlewood, 122.4)
India’s Bowling 1st Innings
Bowlers Overs Maidens Runs conceded Wickets taken Economy rate
Ishant Sharma 27 8 48 1 1.77
Umesh Yadav 24 7 57 1 2.37
Ravichandran Ashwin 49 13 84 2 1.71
Ravindra Jadeja 21.4 1 63 6 2.94
Karun Nair 1 0 7 0 7.00
      India’s Batting 2nd Innings (trail by 87 runs)
Batsmen and dismissal Runs scored No. of 4s No. of 6s Strike rate
Lokesh Rahul

caught Smith, bowled O’Keefe

51 (85) 4 0 60.00
Abhinav Mukund

bowled Hazlewood

16 (32) 1 1 50.00
Cheteshwar Pujara

caught M Marsh, bowled Hazlewood

92 (221) 7 0 41.62
Virat Kohli

leg before wicket Hazlewood

15 (25) 1 0 60.00
Ravindra Jadeja

bowled Hazlewood

2 (12) 0 0 16.66
Ajinkya Rahane

leg before wicket Starc

52 (134) 4 0 38.80
Karun Nair

bowled Starc

0 (1) 0 0 0.00
Wriddhiman Saha

not out

20 (37) 2 1 54.05
Ravichandran Ashwin

bowled Hazlewood

4 (3) 1 0 133.33
Umesh Yadav

caught Warner, bowled Hazlewood

1 (5) 0 0 20.00
Ishant Sharma

caught S Marsh, bowled O’Keefe

6 (28) 1 0 21.42
Extras 15 (11 byes and 4 wides)
India’s total 274 all out in 97.1 overs, at 2.82 runs per over
India’s fall of wickets 39/1 (Mukund, 10.4), 84/2 (KL Rahul, 24.2), 112/3 (Kohli, 34.2), 120/4 (Jadeja, 38.1), 238/5 (Rahane, 84.3), 238/6 (Nair, 84.4), 242/7  (Pujara, 85.2), 246/8 (Ashwin, 85.5), 258/9 (Umesh, 87.3), and 274/10 (Ishant, 97.1)
Australia’s Bowling 2nd Innings
Bowlers Overs Maidens Runs conceded Wickets taken Economy rate
Mitchell Starc 16 1 74 2 4.62
Josh Hazlewood 24 5 67 6 2.79
Nathan Lyon 33 4 82 0 2.48
Steve O’Keefe 21.1 3 36 2 1.70
Mitchell Marsh 3 0 4 0 1.33
Australia’s Batting 2nd Innings (target: 188 runs)
Batsmen and dismissal Runs scored No. of 4s No. of 6s Strike rate
David Warner

leg before wicket Ashwin

17 (25) 1 0 68.00
Matthew Renshaw

caught Saha, bowled Ishant

5 (12) 1 0 41.66
Steve Smith

leg before wicket Umesh

28 (48) 3 0 58.33
Shaun Marsh

leg before wicket Umesh

9 (19) 1 0 47.36
Peter Handscomb

caught Saha, bowled Ashwin

24 (67) 2 0 35.82
Mitchell Marsh

caught Nair, bowled Ashwin

13 (16) 3 0 81.25
Matthew Wade

caught Saha, bowled Ashwin

0 (5) 0 0 0.00
Mitchell Starc

bowled Ashwin

1 (6) 0 0 16.66
Steve O’Keefe

bowled Jadeja

2 (10) 0 0 20.00
Nathan Lyon

caught and bowled Ashwin

2 (6) 0 0 33.33
Josh Hazlewood

not out

0 (0) 0 0 0.00
Extras 11 (8 byes, 2 leg byes and 1 wide)
Australia’s total 112 all out in 35.4 overs, at 3.16 runs per over
Australia’s fall of wickets 22/1 (Renshaw, 4.3), 42/2 (Warner, 9.1), 67/3 (S Marsh, 14.6), 74/4 (Smith, 20.3), 101/5 (M Marsh, 25.6), 101/6 (Wade, 27.5), 103/7 (Starc, 29.4), 110/8 (O’Keefe, 34.2), 110/9 (Handscomb, 35.2), 112/10 (Lyon, 35.4)
India’s Bowling 2nd Innings
Bowlers Overs Maidens Runs conceded Wickets taken Economy rate
Ishant Sharma 6 1 28 1 4.66
Ravichandran Ashwin 12.4 4 41 6 3.30
Umesh Yadav 9 2 30 2 3.33
Ravindra Jadeja 8 5 3 1 0.37

Match report

The No. 1-ranked India in their own den, came roaring back from a mortifying defeat in Pune and won the Bangalore Test by 75 runs. By doing so, they have now levelled the four-Test series 1-1, with the third Test set to begin at the JSCA Stadium in Ranchi, which will become India’s 26th Test venue, on March 16th, 2017.

This great Indian Test victory was built on a complete team effort, with Lokesh Rahul (half-centuries in both the innings), Cheteshwar Pujara (92 in the second innings), Ajinkya Rahane (52 in the second innings), Ishant Sharma (bowled well in both the innings), Umesh Yadav (was dependable with the ball throughout the Test), Ravichandran Ashwin (a match-winning six-fer in the second innings), and Ravindra Jadeja (a vital six-fer in the first innings) making vital contributions which ultimately made the difference in what was a low-scoring Test.

After being bowled out for 189 on day one, India had to play the next three days with their backs to the wall. But India’s comeback started on day two, when their bowlers didn’t concede easy runs, kept the Australian batsmen under pressure and took wickets at regular intervals. The Test match-defining performances for India came from the blades of Pujara and Rahane, the duo who were embroiled in a 118-run fifth wicket partnership, in the final session on day three, and Ravichandran Ashwin, who took six wickets in the second innings, to help India bowl Australia out for 112 on day four, just after tea.

The target of 188 runs for Australia was a bit dicey for both teams, considering how the pitch was behaving: few balls were keeping low, few climbed on the batsmen and the spinners from both the teams had carried a threat throughout. For India, the key was taking early wickets and dismissing David Warner and Smith with a bulk of the lead still intact. For Australia, the key was transferring the pressure onto India by being solid early on and chipping away at the target.

But the hosts—with a bit of luck on day four in terms of the umpiring decisions and DRS, and potent bowling from all four bowlers—came out on top against an Australian batting line-up which had fared better than India in the previous three innings.

Kohli, in his post-match press conference, said that “India surprised themselves with the margin of their victory (75)”, though they had felt a fourth innings target of 150 or more will give them a fair chance to have a go at the Aussies.

India went into the Bangalore Test having compromised on their philosophy of playing four specialist bowlers and a reliable all-rounder. Instead, they brought in Karun Nair in place of Jayant Yadav and Murali Vijay was replaced by his state team-mate Abhinav Mukund, with Vijay unfit due to a shoulder injury.

Kohli won what was a vital toss and opted to bat first. Having sported a fair bit of grass in the lead-up to the Test match, the Bangalore pitch for the 2nd Test had a lot of cracks and was fairly dry on the first day.

While India had made a couple of changes in personnel, Australia retained the same XI from the Pune Test. Nathan Lyon and Steve O’Keefe had gained a psychological edge over the Indian batsmen with their splendid spells in Pune and in Bangalore, they once again got a pitch on which they would have fancied bowling.

The Indian batsmen, though, failed to harness the significant advantage of batting first on a pitch which was expected to deteriorate and become difficult to bat. The dismissals were a result of good, incisive bowling from the Australian bowlers, particularly Lyon, who took 8-50, and error in judgement from the likes of Mukund, Kohli and Rahane, among others.

Lyon enjoyed bowling to the right-hand batsmen in the Indian line-up, as he landed a vast majority of his deliveries outside the batsmen’s off stump, on the bowler’s footmarks and more importantly, the seam was in a perfect position almost every single time. Thanks to these subtleties, Lyon carried a major threat and Indian batsmen had no clue to deliveries which jumped on them from a length.

Despite the brilliance of Australia’s bowling, the Indian batsmen seemed to not have developed a game plan for the 2nd Test after the debacles in Pune. India were bowled out for 189 in their first innings in just 71.2 overs and the advantage of batting first had been squandered.

Australia enjoyed a good start to their first innings, with David Warner and Matthew Renshaw putting together their second 50-run partnership in the series. India, though, to their credit, didn’t allow the visitors to run away with the Test, despite having made only 189.

Ishant Sharma and Umesh Yadav bowled splendid spells on a mercurial day two pitch and the Australian batsmen were strangulated well by good field setting from Kohli and tight bowling from the four Indian bowlers. Kohli, though, was criticised for the way he used Jadeja in Australia’s first innings: Jadeja had bowled only 17 overs at the end of day two, and the number of overs the Saurashtra left-arm spinner had bowled was way less than what the other three bowlers had bowled.

Despite the criticism faced by Kohli, Jadeja delivered wickets when he was called on to bowl and vitally, helped India restrict Australia to 276 in their first innings with a good spell on the morning of day three.

87 was a substantial lead and the India, having not posted 200 yet in three innings in the series, had a tough task on their hands.

But, led by KL Rahul, India got off to a serene and relatively quick start which helped the hosts eat into Australia’s lead of 87. Rahul was solidity personified and was India’s most important batsman. Given the nature of pitch, though, Australia were always in with a shout and soon they started making inroads into the Indian batting line-up. Australia, however, didn’t help themselves by not holding on to the sharp chances they were provided by the Indian batsmen.

From 83/1, India slumped to 120/4 after lunch on day three, with Rahane joining Pujara in the middle ahead of tea on.

But this is where the second and decisive turnaround of the Test match, took shape for India. And, with a bit of luck, India went on to win the Test by a sizeable margin of 75 runs.

Which aspect of the Bangalore Test did you enjoy the most?

2 comments

  1. Overall a good game to level the series. Having said that the wickets of Steve Smith and Handscomb where the ball kept so low, you dont feel a wholesome pride about the Indian bowling performance. Yes they did create pressure, after all they had gone through a wonderful partnership from Rahane and Pujara in the same skeptical pitch. However there is a lot of potential with this Indian then what is uncovered. As always enjoyed the game for a long time now. I would love to witness few Indian wickets prepared such as Perth, WACA, with speed and bounce. Lets hope we finish in a good note at the end of the series. Credits to Kohli for staying the hunt.

    1. Terming the Bengaluru Test between India and Australia as “good” is a bit of an understatement. It provided excitement aplenty and the team who had done well for much of their tour so far (Australia) tasted defeat from the jaws of victory, to relinquish the series lead. The Bengaluru pitch provided plenty for the bowlers and the batsmen had to bat out of their skins most of the time.

      I think, such pitches aren’t uncommon for the Australian batsmen, who, back home, are quite familiar with batting on Australia pitches that tend to have far more pronounced cracks. You can check out a sample of what an Australian pitch can be like here: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2010/nov/18/the-ashes-2010-cracking-pitch-waca.

      Coming to the pitch, you cannot produce pitches as they are in Australia, England, etc., in India Pitches are not just about preparing them in a certain way; instead, one of the keys to a good cricket pitch is climatic conditions before and during a Test match. Sunny weather allows the curator to prepare a good pitch, but then he will have to assess the optimal level of watering, to ensure that the intended level of moisture is right. Also, the characteristics of soils used, also play a part in how they behave. You can read more about pitch preparation here: http://www.cricfooty.com/2016/09/18/indias-home-season-2016-17-test-pitches/

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